Christine Ambrose

Christine Ambrose

Director of the Geospatial Planning and Preservation (GAPP) Center and Assistant Professor of Conservation Biology at Thomas University in Thomasville, Georgia

Christine is the Director of the Geospatial Planning and Preservation (GAPP) Center and Assistant Professor of Conservation Biology at Thomas University in Thomasville, Georgia. She has been working at Thomas University for the past 5 years, instructing Ecology, Conservation and Geographic Information System (GIS) with Global Positioning System (GPS) courses, as well as developing, implementing and overseeing research grants and contract projects through the GAPP Center.

Prior to TU, Christine worked twelve years at Tall Timber’s Research Station and Land Conservancy. While there she conducted postdoctoral research mapping the remaining longleaf pine- wiregrass habitat in the Red Hills Region under a grant from the Turner Foundation, and was subsequently hired on as the Conservation Coordinator for Tall Timber’s Land Conservancy.

Christine received her undergraduate degree in Biological Sciences from Western State College in Gunnison, Colorado. She received her Doctorate in Biological Sciences from Florida Institute of Technology in Melbourne, Florida where she conducted research using GIS to delineate the distribution, abundance and habitat use of the Florida Manatee. In addition, she conducted field studies documenting coral reefs for protection status in the Abaco Island chain in the Commonwealth of the Bahamas.

Presentation

Establishing a Water Trail along the Ochlockonee River in southwest Georgia

Local paddlers and fisherman know the many beauties of the southwest Georgia section of the Ochlockonee River and with a group of supporters have been working to make it a designated Georgia water trail, The Ochlockonee River Water Trail (ORWT). Over the past two years, Conservation-GIS students and interns at Thomas University in Thomasville, Georgia have documented the Georgia stretch of the Ochlocknee River including access sites, historical, cultural and natural resources. All data with photographs were entered into the Georgia River Network’s public online interactive database and a series of maps were created depicting access locations, put-in and take-out shuttle routes, and points of interest. This work has helped support the development of the ORWT and offers resources to assist those eco-tourists and paddlers plan their next adventure, while making the river an asset to the counties and economy of southwest Georgia.